Bad Boy Running

Ep 519 | TBS - Move over Eddie... is Vernon Kay the new "child killer"?

December 08, 2023 Episode 519
Bad Boy Running
Ep 519 | TBS - Move over Eddie... is Vernon Kay the new "child killer"?
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Ever wonder how endurance challenges could potentially change lives? Tune in to our latest episode where we venture into the captivating world of running, charity fundraising, and personal resilience. We navigate through the inspiring stories of Eddie Izzard and Vernon Kay, who pushed their limits for charity. Every stride they took, every mile they ran, was a testament to human endurance and the power of individual commitment to making a difference. Their trials are not just their own, as we also spotlight the personal journeys of Ben Blows and Jamie McDonald, who have utilized unique and creative approaches to raise money for causes close to their hearts.

Meanwhile, the athletic world is not without its share of controversies. We examine the recent ban of talented runner Jacea Zakarowski as a case study, stirring a conversation about the responsibility of athletes and the importance of voicing out issues that matter. Could this ban be a game-changer in the world of athletics? We look into it in our discussion. Also, with Black Friday just around the corner, we couldn't help but touch on the sudden influx of perfume ads, including a critique on the new Burberry perfume advert. 

And, of course, we couldn't leave out our personal experiences on the track. We share the highs and lows of our training, our experiences with park runs, half marathons, and the excitement of future challenges. As runners ourselves, we're always striving to push our limits, break our records, and overcome whatever hurdles we face. Tune in and join us for a deep dive into a world where every challenge is a journey, and every journey is a story worth sharing.

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Speaker 1:

Welcome to Badders, to the Bad Stuff. This is the episode where we talk about what's happening in our lives and the world of running Coming up. We've just finished recording. We talk about Jody's new challenge that he's going to do next year. He's taking on something that actually is chunky Finally, something that is ultra worthy. Yes, I talk about how I've got my zing back and finally getting a bit of pace. We discuss about the one year banning of Jossia from UK Athletics and also Verden, kay's UltraMathen and a few other silly things in there, the silly thing being why is it, when models are advertising and they run like fucking dickheads? That ought to come in the Bad Stuff. Take it away, nick.

Speaker 3:

Bye, bye bye bye, bye, bye, bye, bye.

Speaker 1:

How are you doing, my man?

Speaker 3:

I'm all right. How are you, mr David Hellard?

Speaker 1:

Yes, good good, I've got a list of things to talk about from.

Speaker 3:

From forever, from being away. From months away.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and it does seem there's just so much been happening in the running world last few weeks. What? Have you got on your list that things we could potentially cover.

Speaker 3:

Well, I think something that is particularly relevant is Verden Kay's UltraUltramarathon. And yeah, because I think that this speaks to a confusion that people have about challenges. And you see, there's loads of people who do challenges and they wonder why they don't get sponsorship, or they wonder why they don't have more coverage, they wonder why they're not bigger. And Verden Kay's UltraUltramarathon speaks exactly to what you need to do if you want to raise lots of money, and then it's nothing at all to do with. I'm going to run the length of England 58 times, you know, on my hands or whatever, so you need to be a Radio 2 television presenter.

Speaker 1:

Is that what you're saying?

Speaker 3:

Yes, that's the bare minimum, that's step one of your? Is it from Bolton? Sign up for London.

Speaker 1:

Marathon then become a.

Speaker 3:

No, no, no. Become incredibly famous first and then do a challenge. That's the answer to doing it. Because, that's the thing, because I just think that there was so. And then, when I look back at the conversations that we have with people are going oh I'm going to do this challenge or I'm going to do that challenge and I'm going to do it for charity and things like that, and you just like right, this is not going to be, this is not going to go the way you think it's going to go, because the thing that is going to elevate this is around awareness rather than anything to do with the actual challenge itself.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, it's the story, not the.

Speaker 3:

It's the story. It's the story and how well known you are in the first place, or how well you promote yourself and the thing in the first place. Well, with Vernon, because all I know really is that. So let's just explain what it is he raised five million. Unbelievable. Oh, is it five million? In the end it's five million. So it was called his Ultra-Ultra-Marathon and it was basically a multi-day Ultra. So it was just basically running an Ultra-Marathon. For what? Five days was it?

Speaker 1:

It was 115 miles total, I think, spread across four days.

Speaker 3:

Okay, okay.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, but it's great man, that's decent right.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, absolutely that's good, but the fact, where was it between? It was between its really weird places, wasn't it? It was between.

Speaker 1:

That is all I know. I've not really had time to be Sorry about this.

Speaker 3:

Let me do some quick thing, because I think this is important.

Speaker 1:

Home to Bolton. It says Home to Bolton from somewhere he runs Home to Bolton.

Speaker 3:

That's it Lester to Bolton, which is no one would ever, ever pick that as a start and finish line. I like that as well.

Speaker 1:

If you said to the public, like what's it between Lester and Bolton? What do you think people would say? I would have no idea. I would say probably more than 115 miles. I'd be like I don't know.

Speaker 3:

300 miles, it's quite clever, yeah, exactly you think. Well, it's Midlands to Northwest, isn't it? But Lester's always a difficult one. How far in the Midlands is it Is Midlands, yeah, it's a difficult. Does anyone really know where Lester is? I don't think they do.

Speaker 1:

Does anyone want to know? It's one of those places that you're never going to need to know where Lester is in general, are you?

Speaker 3:

But no, I think it's one of those things where but how did it actually happen?

Speaker 1:

Because we obviously know that is Vernon Kaye, the new Eddie Isard child killer.

Speaker 3:

Well, no, because he had. No. The thing about Eddie Isard is that he set a standard that. Has that changed everything, didn't he? That was the point. He then made every challenge after. If Eddie Isard hadn't come along, vernon Kaye could have run a marathon and probably raised a lot of money. But because Eddie Isard came along, people then thought I need to do 52 marathons in 52 weeks or 52 marathons in 52 days. He's the one that. And then all the money that people didn't raise because they didn't do their challenges didn't go towards children who needed it. That's why he's the is the child killer. You know Vernon Kay has done something that is eminently doable by you know, most, I would say, experienced ultra marathon runners and probably not, you know, probably pretty hard for for someone that you know has to work on on the radio all the time and stuff like that. So definitely challenge, but but definitely not a child killer. Definitely not child killer in the same, in the same level.

Speaker 1:

And so with with Vernon, then how did the actual June? Did you know what happened each day on the challenge then? Was he going for a certain time? Did he have any specific rules about it, or he just went out and ran the? What would it be? I guess around 29 miles a day.

Speaker 3:

Yes, I don't. I don't know if there was anything like that. All I, everything that I saw about it was a lot of it came, a lot of it focused around this one point, which has nothing to do with running, that someone called Kay Vernon also came and joined him on part of that. So a woman called Kay Vernon and she ran it backwards. Which again goes to show that actually, and that got a shitload of press, that got a lot of coverage and stuff like that, and so it's just one of those things, isn't it? That just thinking about like weird stuff like that and gets it more coverage, it's like it's bizarre.

Speaker 1:

And how did you do you know how he actually did? Was he? Was he like absolutely broken each day? Was he just doing a good run walk strategy and getting through it relatively successfully, or I, from what I could see, I, I, I don't know how much.

Speaker 3:

It's really hard. If you've never done those distances before and like toenails are falling off and things like that, it probably feels as though it's all going to shit, whereas I think if you do that on a regular basis you'd be like, oh, that's just, that's what happens. So I think I think he I don't think it would he was really struggling. I think he kind of struggled with some of the elements of it, but I don't think I don't think he was ever in doubt that he would do it.

Speaker 1:

And the good thing actually is that there is in our world now doing a hundred mile of seams, almost like a rite of passage of someone who's properly into altruism, whereas this is almost reinforced how hard that is Because the pub with with the Eddie is on, it did reframe running a marathon and even doing back to back marathons and I think the frustration with that is Eddie was taking like 10 hours some days to do that, and so to me that that goes outside it changes the challenge so much that actually I think a lot of people could just turn up untrained and walk with breaks slowly and do the challenge without and without it being too gruesome, whereas Vernon has, if anything, done the reverse, where he's shown because he's, he's almost shown how hard it was to do slightly more than a math, and four times when you group those together it's not much further than like Tim's path really.

Speaker 3:

But I think, I do think. I mean, I think the thing is you look at the distance and it's not about the distance, it's about the challenge in a multi-day is getting up next day, like you know. Like you know, like it's getting up next day and having to do it, and getting up next day and having to do it again on next day. It was 100 mile. You just keep going through, you can just keep going through and you can get it done within 24 hours or I don't think the public would necessarily realise that I think this, if anything.

Speaker 1:

No, no, they wouldn't and it wouldn't.

Speaker 3:

And it wouldn't and it wouldn't get as much press. But he could do 150 miles and if he took basically 36 hours to do it, it wouldn't be seen as as anywhere big as taking four days to do one hundred and fifty and actually for the news cycle.

Speaker 1:

It's good because it takes a lot of time for things to filter through and then people can come back to it and actually having that multi stage allows the interest to gather and the and part of the news then becomes how much has been raised so far, and you can then use that as part of the, the amplification.

Speaker 3:

And also because you know social media is, you know it's so, like content, hunger, stuff, like taking, you know, four or five hours to run that each day is a bad idea. You want to take as long as possible to complete this in the day. You need to stop off, have lunch halfway through. You need to meet people. You need to. You know you are. You are rewarded for taking longer because you know there's more opportunity for people to meet you, there's more chance for people to catch you. You know, especially if you know word gets round, that you're running through a town or something, it gives people enough time to get onto the street and stuff like that. So, and having those kind of updates and everything, almost like when the kind of like Olympic torch like came through and everything, there was a kind of a little bit of a buzz around that Like that's the, that's that. That's the way to do it. If you, I think if you focus on you, just a lot of it is just to focus on what, what makes a good story and what and how can, how can people interact with that story as much as possible and say, oh, I saw Vernon or I went to a video of Vernon and you know and showed it on, you know my social media and things like that. I think it's just building all that's, all of that stuff, into it.

Speaker 1:

And actually when we we had a really good interview quite a few years ago, ben Blows, who'd raised a huge amount of money by running around at a Tesco's car park but it was linked to where he lived, it was linked to the Tesco's got involved. It was also linked to the charity which is a hospice in the area, I think. So, again, it was all these elements that then people could latch on to and think I'm linked to this personally and people will come around and do laps to film. And it was yeah, it went through. And the same with Jamie. When we spoke to Jamie McDonald and he is a venture man, he's just incredible and some of his challenges where he'd go to, he'd go to people's houses where they wanted to raise money for their children and instead of Jamie doing the challenge, he'd think of challenges that they would then undertake because it was so powerful in connecting with the local community. And so one of the dads, for example, run up the local hill, the height of Everest, and it was just horrific and the raised a huge amount of money because it had that personal interaction every step of the way. So those two if you're thinking of, if you're looking to try and raise money. Listen to those two as examples of what you can do to try and to connect with people in a way that is more than just I'm doing something hard, but actually even get them to respect what you're doing and empathize with it to the extent they'll give more, or to actually get them feel like they're involved and invested in it. Did you see?

Speaker 3:

I do think, then, because that's the thing I think there is a sometimes and I've definitely experienced this when I was journalist interviewing people there's definitely it's really clear when there is a self-serving element there as to I'm doing this in order to get me expert, in order to for me to position myself so I can then sell stuff or I can do stuff or things like that, or to do a race or to get into the marathon, or yeah, exactly so and and the you know the I spoke to anyone in marketing knows that you make it about. You know the end, the end user, the end person, the person, the end user, the person that's going to be spending the money, rather than the than yourself and like just the thing. You know, one thing that came out loads in a lot of the like, the burning case stuff was that if you look at all the news stories and stuff like that, they were all focused on, like all the stories that were being shared, people like listeners who were phoning him up, people. There was a there was a thing as a bring Barbara to Bolton hashtag campaign from someone that had written a letter to him and everything. So it's just it's all those little kind of like sub stories and things like that. As much as you can kind of latch onto that and do that. That's what makes it interesting In many ways. That's when I was writing race reports and stuff back in men's running. I was never really writing about my race, it was always about what's the other story like. Here it has to be more like a travelogue or more about I think I did a story about, basically I did the Conti Lightning Run, which ultimately is a very what Lightning Run, conti Lightning Run.

Speaker 1:

Okay, okay.

Speaker 3:

What is it? Is it called something else now?

Speaker 1:

No, no, no. I just thought you said it very quickly it was. I thought you were passing judgment on the Lightning Run, but no, no, no, no I wasn't.

Speaker 3:

No, no, I wasn't. But ultimately all of that, Ultimately it's a very boring thing where you're just doing laps, You've got a lap thing and so that. But then I spoke to some bloke who was broken his back like a month. It wasn't called about six months before, so I knew and it was back running again. That kind of stuff is much more interesting than running some laps and stuff like that. It's just about pulling those things in and doing it that way. Yeah, I think that's what People love. Shit like that. That captures imagination, don't they?

Speaker 1:

They do, they do. We've got a few other things. Do you see that Jacea has received a one-year ban from the UK Athletics? Who? Who went? What we spoke around? It's quite a while back now, but Jacea Zagreski I'll try and pronounce that name properly. Jacea Zakarowski, who she's run like the British 48-hour record before I think she even had the Women's World Record for 48 hours. She's a very established runner. She's running the Commonwealth Games for the marathon. They ended up saying that she should be banned for a year. If you remember back to previous race where she got in the car got out of the car and then finished and came in third place. It's interesting because it was one of those circumstances where you've felt she'd been slightly injured. She'd said she had brain fog and was jet lagged as well because she'd just flown in and was also embarrassed. It didn't read as if I'm doing this to try and cheat to get third place. The circumstances very much seemed like I wasn't feeling great. I got in the car but then two and a half miles later I felt a bit better. I then just thought sorry, let's finish this. I came in and happened to be third. It's interesting the way they it's the UK Athletics Code of Conduct and their disciplinary panel they decided that, given that she said that she was tired and the jet lagging, all these things In the moment, the pressure meant that she didn't feel that she could say anything. They then said and it sounds quite fair what they said actually she then had after that the time to mention it to the organizers. She had the week afterwards in which she could have said look, guys, once the crowds went around. Actually, guys, I don't really feel comfortable taking this third, the fact that she'd posted to social media saying I got third here, all these things. She said that if that, they could almost understand and forgive the brain fog and that momentary lapse of judgment given the circumstances. But actually there was all this period afterwards in which she could have held her hand up and she didn't. So she's been given a year ban and to me that seems fair and actually a sensible way in which they've assessed this. I'd say I completely agree with their logic behind that.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, that makes a lot of sense. That is really good logic. You have time to yeah when you're not in the circus of being with everyone else and you have to have time to think about it. That's your opportunity to come back and say actually, there is an issue with this.

Speaker 1:

Now here's a question have you seen the new Burberry perfume advert on television?

Speaker 3:

No, I haven't why Watch out for it, and there's a lot of those perfume ads started so much earlier than they normally do.

Speaker 1:

Because they've got Black Friday in now. So the lady from Bad Is it Sex Education?

Speaker 3:

Oh yeah.

Speaker 1:

I can't remember her name. Have a look, so Do. Bad, as it's called, godess is the new drink. Now I'm going to send you the link to this, because this is one of those circumstances where oh shit, I've just messaged the wrong Jodie. That is very weird. Wait, wait, wait, wait, wait. How many Jodies do you know? Too many? I mean one's too many, right? So here's the link to the advert. She runs in the advert and where have you sent this?

Speaker 3:

Where am I looking at?

Speaker 1:

People should never run in an advert unless they're running running.

Speaker 3:

I don't understand why they don't actually get someone, that our run is so ugly and deformed and you know they should just go to midnight runners They've got loads of people there who are gorgeous, who are absolutely just get game on, get game on for sure.

Speaker 1:

So she starts running the advert and from that moment on it's going to be this really cool advert. But you suddenly I can't do anything other than focus. See the extended version. She's running a bit cooler, but in the short one, like this is not a runner and she's not running in a normal way, and this is super weird, that you think that this is how someone would run if they were actually running normally.

Speaker 3:

Alright, just wait a second. I'm just going to watch this. Okay, here we go. What Do you?

Speaker 1:

know what they need. Running consultants for advert.

Speaker 3:

They do have running consultants. They have running consultants. They have a five-year-old boy who tells it in order to run as fast as you can. You have to do this because it cuts through the air much quicker.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, she looks like she. She looks like the T. Is it the T1000 or T3000 from Terminator 2? Who's running with knives for hands?

Speaker 3:

It's weird, isn't it? Like it goes to show that even something as simple as running, if you don't do it, it really is obvious. Like, is this the other thing? Like I obviously know this from a horse pony perspective, but I can see someone like riding the horse. I'm like, oh, it's just someone riding the horse. And then, like my daughter sits on her hind legs and she's like, oh, my goodness, it just looks ridiculous. I'm like he looks exactly the same to me. I can't tell the difference between those two things. Like they look exactly the you know. Oh, that's just embarrassing, it's absolutely embarrassing. Yeah, I don't know. I don't know why running really thwarts people. Because it's not. It's not as if, like oh, she's pretending to play tennis or she's pretending to do something else, like why is I? Do wonder whether they get directed as well into doing weird shit like that.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, you need to look as if you're a powerful runner.

Speaker 3:

It wouldn't look because it needs to, because you're running next to the lions there. It needs to look powerful in a certain way, doesn't it? And really kind of emphatic, which is a very hard thing to do if you're just like running normally.

Speaker 1:

And there's probably an element if she's running as fast as she can, her hair and everything will look bad and so she can't really do that. But I just wanted to bring but do bad as. Look out for this advert. Let us know what you think of that running style. Like but other I've been, I've been training a bit more, mate. I've been running, yeah, yeah, like I. I've suddenly, weirdly, I'm now into my, I'm inspired to train hard now this last couple of weeks. I tell you what, not being traveling, not traveling the whole time, just being at home and having a constant schedule, it's pretty easy doing loads of training, it's so much easier. Oh my God, suddenly I can just train in a normal. But it's amazed me. So I, I was going to do a park run or an equivalent on the Saturday and didn't get around to it because of baby stuff. So on the Sunday, when I kind of wanted to do a tempo run, but I hadn't but wanted to do a longest run. So I decided I'm just going to go to the local park and I'm going to run a half marathon as fast as I can and and just see what happens. Oh my God, forgot what that's like Six, seven miles in dying out my arse and it's like right, let's drop some caffeine and just see how long we can hold on telling myself, just get to 10 miles, that's good enough. Ended up doing the whole half and happy as Larry. And now that that one massively hard session suddenly went out and did a park run, dropped in my own, my own, not park run, did my own run before park run the next Saturday because I was up anyway, wanted to get out of the way. Sub 18 straight off. Oh wow, couldn't believe it. Like took something like the 40 seconds off the previous 5k I'd done just cause I'd done one. I'd done a couple of 400 meter sessions this week to four and then that that hard half and suddenly my body's like, oh yeah, let's go. And it made me think all this 80, 20 running that we read about, I think that's so overrated and there's just a few hard training sessions can massively transform yourself. So now I'm suddenly thinking actually, now that I'm waking up at six to look after the baby every day anyway, I can probably train before work fairly often and suddenly start doing quite a lot of training. Fuck me, I'm already doing like it's not, like it's that fast a time compared to what I'd want. But actually I suddenly feel like I'm in the realm of being back to a time in my life when I was running, when I was training relatively hard and, you know, running relatively fast, I can suddenly taste it. So, mate, you've got to get, you got to join me, you got to start training more, do some hard sessions and just see what happens.

Speaker 3:

You know what that's, that it didn't occur to me until the other day that my road is actually absolutely perfect for hill repeats, because I was like, looking, I was going, I'll be good to have somewhere that'd be quite good for that, and I was like, wait a minute, our road is like perfect length and there's nothing on it and it's and it's and it's great. But I have been, I've been, I've been running almost every day, and now that the, now that the most horrific storm weather seems to have ended, finally which made it but then I did, I've joined the gym anyway, so I've gone back to the gym. So but yeah, I've been, I've been, I've got, I've got in my mind something I want to do for January ahead of the head of the run show what?

Speaker 1:

are you thinking?

Speaker 3:

I just got this idea that I want to run to the run show. Make it from right, no go right into Birmingham to the run, so over a few days this should be you've earned a king, it, I've earned a K, that's what I would say. People will know. Brighton to Birmingham, though, and I think it's a relatively easy route, isn't it? So, mark Bains doing it, bringing back the London to Brighton, and you know originally what's it called? The old ultra event, the 100 year old version, rather than the hunt.

Speaker 1:

Does that mean it's on the road?

Speaker 3:

I don't think I did well. Parts of it are, parts of it are on the road and but he's doing it in reverse. So it's bright into London because it's easier to stay in Brighton and go out from London, whereas if you've got to go into London you've got to stay in London and that is really really, really expensive. Yeah yeah yeah, and difficult to do. So actually I think that's quite a good idea. So I think what you could do is you could do that route into London and then canal it all the way up to Birmingham. It's just a simple, it's just a relatively simple route, but I think that'd be pretty good. Nice little challenge. It's not the distance. I think there's a challenge. It's going to be the weather, so what it's going to be like over a few days. But I quite like the idea of it turning up in Birmingham, because the thing is we drive to Birmingham and you know, and we do the one show, stuff like that, and then we get and then we interview people and they've all just, oh, we've just come off the spine or I've just come on, like something like that. And I feel like, you know, if we running to the run show feels as though it is, it feels appropriate, it feels absent, isn't it, it feels it. It feels happy, it feels like you know you take some time to get there. You know really appreciate it End up in a beautiful, beautiful city. Yeah, I'm going to drag a load of bloody merch with me this time, so, although that would make that a lot more, Jody takes, you know, 150 mugs with him on a trailer while running up to up to Birmingham. I mean, that would be an interesting.

Speaker 1:

But we might. We might finally be back to be able to start doing some challenges now because I'm feeling more confident in my injury the fact that I'm probably on what sub three marathon pace If I was to go out and give it an attempt and so a bit more training and I'm happy to actually start running longer. So next year could be the year that we've it's almost. It's been probably five years since we've been back in challenge made because of injuries.

Speaker 3:

And so next year has to be, the year, is going to be, the year where I'm going to break sub four. It's got to be, it's got to be.

Speaker 1:

Let's line it up for once. I know golden trial dates. Yeah, let's line it up and actually get that moving. And I'm going to start thinking about probably going to run a 10 K with Leroy in December, just to see, just set a benchmark. I don't have a 10 K PB, so that's going to be hopefully well, I mean I, just because it's just a distance, never come up in training for marathons or ulcers. So, and actually good that I can get a PB, although it won't be one I want to remember, I'm sure.

Speaker 3:

But my only 10 PB is from being driven, being dressed as Buzz Lightyear doing some run on clap and combo for men's running. That's, that's my I don't. I don't even know if I've got a time for that. I don't even know they gave you a time for that. I think that's the only. That's the only 10 K that I've ever done.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, yeah, well, perfect. Maybe next year we both set those as part of other challenges, because that's certainly new marathon training. Hopefully you'll be getting fast as well and and that should help. And actually, if you don't know, I can invite you to it. But I'm going to be doing a talk next week in Steve Bartlett's offices to him and his team about caffeine and training and all those things and how to get fast for marathons, so maybe I need to invite you there and get you involved.

Speaker 3:

You know you're not going to invite me there and go and look what happens. If you don't, I'm a prop.

Speaker 1:

Absolutely, of course. Of course, the before, the before. But, um, well, I'm going to go and look after baby shortly, but do bad, as we're going to ask you in the group, firstly what you make of the running style of uh, of our, our model for this Burberry advert, what your thoughts are? Um, we asked a couple of questions in the group previously. One of them was to do a trans volcano out of UTMB, but actually we now know the full story, now that we have um. We've interviewed one of the races, the Hong Kong 100, to do with the um, the math, the ultra man of the majors. So if you've not listened to that episode, do go listen to it. Some other great episodes for you to listen to are Gabe talking about taking midnight runners to I think it's 18 new countries or new cities around the world Amazing episode, all about community Um. And we've also got episodes coming up with Brian Metz of the founder of trail running magazine and the trail runner magazine in the States, and Alex, and he ran 24 hour track race by himself, unguided, blindfolded and deaf Um, so he completely blocked his senses. It's like an insane episodes where he nearly loses his mind.

Speaker 3:

Um and all during the episode in recording.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, but if you've got any other suggestions of guests. We're going to be chatting to someone about a running. A 50k on LSD is coming up. We're hopefully getting Zach Bitter back to talk about his training, which has been periodized with low carbs, which we can talk to, hopefully, how to actually do it in a way that's good, rather than the kind of Timnake's approach which is all carbs are evil. And any other guests suggestions, let us know, yep.

Speaker 3:

If you want to join in the conversation, head over to bad boy running podcast on Facebook. Type in three questions. Well, answer three questions. Don't type in three questions. Answer three questions and we'll let you in. You can join in the conversation there. If you want to buy merch, head to storebadboyrunningcom.

Speaker 1:

Well, thanks for seeing guys. Please do rate and review. It really helps with our visibility and lock in the run show in Boston and the run show in Birmingham. We've got some amazing guests, including Ashley, who's trying to think who's coming. We've Beth Pascal is going to be returning. She's going to be talking about winning Western States and overcoming injury. We've got Yasmin Paris coming. We've got Nikki Spinks coming. We've got trying to think of some of our male guests who are coming. So it's not just Robbie Britton is going to be talking there. Fantastic Vasos, vasos, alexander, elsie Davis. We've got a huge. I'm John Gent from our own bad boy, running, run, walk, run walk.

Speaker 3:

I would say he's a run walk advocate, but he's more than that he's a run walk fundamentalist.

Speaker 1:

He is, he is, he takes it, he. He only run walks for buses.

Speaker 3:

He's missed buses before he will not run for anything, even when his children were being born and things like he would never run walk. He had to run walk to get you. He just does not. It does not rush for anyone.

Speaker 1:

Yeah never, never, we're going to be. We've got Tom Jolly, who won the Ultra X series championships then also was the first Brit UTMB this year, and Shane Ely, who puts on the Dragon's back, cape Raff race director, so there's so many people they're going to be there worth booking for and really, of course, returns. Well, thanks, houston, guys, and we will see you next time.

Speaker 3:

See you later.

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